Monthly Archives: August 2015

Sport in Australia: What on earth is going on right now?

This week on the ABC’s QandA, Annabel Crabbe noted that if Australian politicians were considering what they said better than our tennis players were, they were doing OK. Tennis fan or not, everyone in the room got the reference.

In good old ‘Straya, sport is so much a part of our culture that politicians and journalists use these kinds of metaphors, university subjects tackle Sport & Popular Culture together, and the coalescence of sport and popular culture in the Australian imagination are discussed in both the mainstream press and in academia. So if we’re going to look at shifting the shape of popular culture, sooner or later, we were going to have to deal with sport on some level. And sure, I was expecting it to be a kids’ book about a soccer-playing werewolf or something, but since I haven’t come across one yet and this is such a big thing in our nation right now (and only likely to get more airtime with the US Open coming up), it seems like it’s time to look at what’s going on.

This past month the media debate about what it’s OK to say and what it’s not OK to say, on and off a sporting field, has been omnipresent. And it’s ongoing. Recently, rising Aussie tennis star Nick Kyrgios “sledged” his opponent Stan Wawrinka by “letting him know” that his rumoured girlfriend Donna Vekic had at some time in the past allegedly made a presumably informed, adult choice to have sex with someone else whom Kyrgios knew – his teammate and friend, fellow Aussie rising star Thanasi Kokkinakis. All four people involved in this saga are current tennis players on the circuit. Realistically, probably none of them wanted this news broadcast by the omnipresent microphones and cameras courtside. But Kyrgios is the only one who had agency in this story breaking. He really stepped outside the bounds of professional behaviour – not to mention basic manners – and has rightly worn the consequences. Matters were not helped  when first Kyrgios’ Mum and then his brother attempted to defend his actions, saying Wawrinka had sledged him first (which is not, frankly, an unbelievable accusation, but doesn’t excuse anything that came afterwards) and then big bro Christos making an unfortunate comment about Vekic, using a pun on Kokkinakais’ nickname and instagram handle . Kokkinakis was then harassed later in the tournament by an unrelated aggressive opponent who somehow seemed to think that the “Special Ks” were not actually doubles partners, but the same person.

PERTH, AUSTRALIA - SEPTEMBER 14: Thanasi Kokkinakis and Nick Kyrgios of Australia look on from the team bench during the reverse singles match between Sam Groth and Temur Ismailov of Uzbekistan during the Davis Cup World Group Playoff tie between Australia and Uzbekistan at Cottesloe Tennis Club on September 14, 2014 in Perth, Australia. (Photo by Paul Kane/Getty Images)

The Special Ks in happier, less controversial times (Davis Cup tie in Perth, September 2014)

Kyrgios is a 20 year old  who has had a meteoric rise up the tennis rankings over the last eighteen months. He is one of the most talented players I can recall seeing in a lifetime of watching tennis. He is also currently trying to navigate the circuit and all its associated media circus and social media pitfalls without a coach or any kind of outside support team who have experience on the circuit. An overprotective family is not quite cutting it.

nick-kyrgios-tennis-montreal-masters_3336191

I call this Nick’s “Mr T” period

Earlier in the month there was another controversy, this one in stark contrast to the soapie-like qualities of the who-slept-with-whom-in-the-tennis-world drama. This was one centred on one of the elder statesmen of Australian sport, former Australian of the Year, Adam Goodes. I don’t watch AFL and don’t intend to start, so I cannot comment on his on-field behaviour or skill. But off the field, he is ambassador for the Racism. It stops with me. campaign, which basically tells folks that when they see or hear racism, they need to point it out and say it’s not OK. He is currently the face of the “Recognise” campaign, which seeks to add acknowledgement of Indigenous Australians to the Constitution’s preamble. He does charity work to improve the lot of Indigenous kids.

Recognise

Recognise

His greatest sin, apparently, is that he did an Aboriginal war dance on the field after scoring. In the Indigenous round. You know, the one where a particular fuss is made about Indigenous culture. Cos Lord knows, there’s no precedent for this kind of thing.

He also famously once called security to a 13 year old who called him an ape while he was playing. Security removed the teenager. The police interviewed the teenaged. Goodes was asked if he wanted to press charges and he declined. Ever since, there has been a weird undercurrent in social and even some more mainstream media of “he should apologise for what he did to that little girl.” Peter FitzSimons summed this up so beautifully that I don’t think I need to say anything else; other than, I read the girl’s mother defending her actions with the weirdest argument ever while demanding an apology from Goodes: “She was technically still only 12. I mean, she’d only turned 13 a few days earlier.”

Technically, I don’t think you know what “technically” means. And usually the person who’s done the wrong thing apologises, not the victim. I mean, even Nick Kyrgios has apologised (although Wawrinka has claimed it wasn’t done “properly”).

Anyway, so Adam Goodes was being booed and harassed on the field. In fact, he was harrassed to the point where he said it was impacting his mental health and he had to take a break from the game. Some people say it’s not based on race, because other Indigenous players weren’t being booed; some say they have a right to boo and were booing because they don’t like Goodes (my response to this was, “why do we need to boo in sport, anyway? It’s not done in tennis!” But then Kyrgios was booed in Cincinnati after the sledging incident, so maybe I’m really out of step.). But when you followed most social media posts, it seemed that sooner or later the commenters came back to, “I don’t like him because of what he did to that little girl” (ie pointed out that it is not OK to use a racial slur that suggests Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are sub-human). Which is, of course, about race. And regardless of your “reasons,” when is it OK to bully someone to the point where they can’t actually go to work?

In the midst of all this, I unexpectedly received a message from a former student. Kieran is now in his final year of Engineering; I worked with him at Kip McGrath (now Nowra Tutoring Solutions), when he was studying for his Higher School Certificate. Kieran had been so moved by the Adam Goodes story that he had written a piece about it, and he asked me to have a read and suggest any changes. It was pretty powerful stuff, and didn’t need much input from me. I told him it was too good for a Facebook post and he should try to get it published.

And so, here is Kieran’s piece on The Roar, linked with his permission.

If you have any questions for Kieran about the writing, editing or publishing process involved, pop them in the comments below and we’ll be sure to pass them on. As I said at the time, I am one very proud old Teacher-Lady. I love that I have students who keep in touch and still turn to me for writing or other professional advice years later; I love seeing passion for social justice, and I particularly love when they know that if they combine these two things they’re going to be supported in it.


London Calling: Pop Culture versus High Culture

There has been much excitement in the world of the authors of this humble blog lately – we were  briefly reunited. Dr Roslyn upped and buggered off to the Mother Country a couple of years back, and so all our work has been done online (as opposed to our previous model, which was largely online, but every now and then I’d ring her up and announce, “I can’t write! This isn’t working! I’m too distracted!” and invite myself to her place for a working sleepover, sans kids).

So when I got an email asking me if I’d consider submitting an abstract for a conference in Oxford, the answer was a resounding yes. Oxford! OXFORD! You know, where Lyra and Pan were? Where Tolkien and Lewis studied? Where Alice is set and Harry was shot? That’s only a couple of hours away from where Roslyn is currently living, in a country I’ve always wanted to visit but had never quite made it? That one?

Yes, please.

Yes, please.

So, yes, I submitted the abstract. And they accepted it. So off I set for the 13th Inter-Disciplinary Net Monsters and the Monstrous Conference: Monstrous Hungers.

But what to present? Well, with the Wolf Girls getting the band back together, it had to be something wolfy. And since my Day Job is working with students with disabilities (mainly mental health disorders), and Job #2 is training high school teachers how to deal with and engage adolescents, I opted to go with Martin Millar’s Wolf Girl trilogy: about an anxious, depressed, cutting, homeless addict who also happens to be a teenage werewolf.

Millar's trilogy curse of wolf KALIX.indd

The itinerary was pretty much skewed to popular, rather than high, culture. We started with a trip to Wimbledon. I am not a believer in “Bucket Lists,” but when I was treated for cancer at the ripe old age of 31, a family decision was made that some things on the “we can do that in retirement” list needed to be moved to the “do it if the opportunity arises” list, and we set off to visit the Australian Open and the Great Ocean Road once my treatment was completed. After that taste of Grand Slam action, I thought I’d like to complete my own Slam (as a spectator) – Wimbledon, the US in New York (hey, it’s New York! – also on the must-see-but-never-been list) and if you’re going to go to three of them, you might as well go to the fourth, even if it is on clay. Plus, Paris. But up until going to visit someone who actually lived in the suburb of Wimbledon, I was still on Step 1.

So I was introduced to the wonders of The Queue, and then the even more wondrous idea that slightly used tickets get handed back in and you can buy a cheap second-hand ticket and actually get onto Centre Court to watch Finals. I still cannot believe that this actually happened.

Continuing the Wimbledon theme, we headed into Wimbledon Common where Roslyn assured me I would find no actual Wombles.

I know a Womble when I see one

I know a Womble when I see one

wombles on commmon

Or three …

Continuing the low culture theme, we then set out on a quest to locate Sun Hill.

If the guys were hanging around out the front, that would be even better ...

If the guys were hanging around out the front, that would be even better …

We knew that the studio and Sun Hill set was in Wimbledon. We found out the address (we are researchers, after all). And then we kept seeing police cars as we trudged through the drizzle of an out-of-the-way industrial estate.

This was a good sign ...

A good sign?

I was ready to give up but Roslyn (as usual) had done more research than me, and was therefore more confident of an outcome. And we turned the corner and there it was … Sun Hill station. There was much gasping and carrying on from me, and I was there hyperventilating long enough for a security guard to come and advise us we “couldn’t be on site” but to take as many photos as we needed on the way out.

sun hill

Embarrassingly happy

We also had a trip to the London Eye (which did NOT act as an aerial for Doctor Who, on that occasion), walked all over London including around Westminster Abbey (where David Tennant was NOT playing a conniving politician, on this occasion), took a  Beatles-esque photo on Abbey Road and –another highlight–checked out Mamma Mia in Covent Garden.

Doctors 9 and 10 hung out hereMamma Miaabbey roadBut there was one very big, high culture moment … Richard II at Shakespeare’s Globe. Not gonna lie, there was a teary moment when that idea hit home.

Globe

Bear in mind, I’m a recovering English teacher

And on to Oxford. The conference was held in Mansfield College and the meals were served in a Harry Potter-esque chapel.

mansfield collegeseats

The conference was fascinating and intense and as we’ve already established in Oxford. And afterwards a few of us managed to have our final dinner and drink at The Turf, where former Australian PM Bob Hawke broke the world skolling record and former US President Bill Clinton allegedly did not inhale.

I can't down a yard glass at all, let alone in that time frame

I can’t down a yard glass at all, let alone in that time frame

Ros joined me the day after the conference for some literary nerd Oxford adventures. We checked out Blackwell’s bookshop (where they were celebrating the 150th anniversary of Alice in Wonderland), and went to the Eagle and Child (where Tolkien and Lewis hung out), and also the Marks of Genius exhibition at the Bodleian Library which blew my tiny little mind by having things on display like Tolkien’s hand-drawn cover for the Hobbit; a 13-year-old Jane Austen’s novel, dedicated to her sister, Cassandra; the original hand-written draft of The Wind in the Willows; and two excised pages of Shelley’s Frankenstein, in which Frankenstein and Clerval roam around Oxford.

Free exhibition, people.

IMG_0971

If you look closely, you can see my mind *actually* being blown

This trip had it all:  sport and Shakespeare, ABBA and Abbey Road, Wimbledon and Wombles, werewolves and woodentops, sandstone and Shelley. It was the best of pop music, pop culture, literature and drama. Anytime London calls, I reckon I’ll go.